Hedge magic spells generator

What spells does my character get? This generator suggests a spell from each sphere, listed with its base cost and maintenance, allowing characters to pick their starting spells at random (within the limits of their ability, as per the Basic Rules’ chapter on magic).

When a spell originates from elsewhere than the Basic Rules, this is noted.

Spells marked with * indicates that the game master should consider whether he wants this spell to be randomly available in the game setting. These spells can be game changers, capable of wrecking considerable havoc on a game master’s carefully crafted storylines if used lightly.


Sphere of All:
Circle of Farsight (Cost 150, Maintenance 2/round)

Sphere of Air:
Illusion Piercing (Cost 20, Maintenance 2/round)

Sphere of Earth:
Stone Vision (Cost 50, Maintenance 1/minute)

Sphere of Fire:
Campire (Cost 20, Maintenance n/a)

Sphere of Water:
Bless the Well (Cost 50, Maintenance n/a)

Sphere of Darkness:
Dead Voices (Cost 50, Maintenance 2/question)

Sphere of Light:
Circle of Healing Hands (Cost 40, Maintenance n/a)

Sphere of Time:
Crystal Rune (Cost 100, Maintenance 5/round)

Sphere of Fate:
Scapegoat (Cost 100, Maintenance n/a)

Sphere of Law:
Rune of Cleansing (Cost 30, Maintenance 1/hour)

Sphere of Chaos:
Circle of Shapechanging (Cost 100, Maintenance n/a)


To generate another set of suggestions, simply refresh the page.

True magic and talents spell generator

What spells does my character get? This generator suggests a spell from each sphere, listed with its base cost and maintenance, allowing characters to pick their starting spells at random (within the limits of their ability, as per the Basic Rules’ chapter on magic).

When a spell originates from elsewhere than the Basic Rules, this is noted.

Spells marked with * indicates that the game master should consider whether he wants this spell to be randomly available in the game setting. These spells can be game changers, capable of wrecking considerable havoc on a game master’s carefully crafted storylines if used lightly.


Sphere of All:
Minion (Cost 50, Maintenance n/a)

Sphere of Air:
Camouflage (Cost 5, Maintenance 1/round)

Sphere of Earth:
Earth Friendship (Cost 20, Maintenance 2/round)

Sphere of Fire:
Combustion (Cost 20, Maintenance 2/round)

Sphere of Water:
Icicles (Cost 10, Maintenance n/a)

Sphere of Darkness:
Mind Blast (Cost 10, Maintenance n/a)

Sphere of Light:
Sphere of Daylight (Cost 50, Maintenance 2/round)

Sphere of Time:
Origin (Cost 20, Maintenance n/a)

Sphere of Fate:
Celestial Friend* (Cost 30, Maintenance n/a)

Sphere of Law:
Truesight* (Cost 50, Maintenance 5/round)

Sphere of Chaos:
Mirror (Cost 20, Maintenance 2/round)


To generate another set of suggestions, simply refresh the page.

Merobaud Roulant, Inquisitor (luminary)

“A man sins out of entitlement or out of desperation. He feels that life owes him more, and turns to foreign deities and occult practises to increase his lot. Or he is desperately trying to survive, and turns to foreign deities because they will provide for him and his children where the faith will not. As long as men turn from the true path out of honest need, it is we, the well fed and well clothed, who are at fault. Our response must be care and education first, and the whip and pyre only when nothing else will save a soul.”

Merobaud Roulant, Inquisitor


Few organisations spark wariness in player characters the way the name of the Inquisition does. Fantasy setting or history, a faith or church bureaucracy’s official investigators and enforcers are typically viewed with caution, distaste, or outright fear by the heroes portrayed by the players. The arrival on-scene of the church’s official Inquisitors is bound to shake up the story. Whether the heroes are allies of the religious organisation in question, or its starch opponents, they must respond. More so if the Inquisitor in question turns out to maybe not be quite a bad guy after all.

Non-player character with stats, personality, and plot bunnies, all wrapped up for insertion in your historical and/or fantasy campaign.

Right-click to read Merobaud Roulant in another tab or save the pdf file to your hard drive.

What are luminaries?

Luminaries are non-player characters who can be inserted into an existing campaign or storyline. Luminaries are not necessarily influential or powerful; they are people who, for some reason or other, can set off a story. While luminaries can reference literature or movies they need to be able to exist out of context. They must be easily adaptable to an existing game setting of somebody else’s design. Luminaries usually require integration with an on-going storyline or setting.

Inn, pub or tavern: What’s it called?

An inn needs a name! This generator offers five randomly generated name suggestions for inns, pubs, and taverns. Most suggestions are based off traditional (mostly British) naming conventions.

In addition, you get three genuine names of inns, pubs or taverns from real life (mostly the UK), for inspiration. Some are of mythical origin, some offer specific services. Some are named for historical figures or events, and some are just plain funny. A few are named for the clearly mythical and never-actually-seen, such as the Honest Politician.

This generator provides a randomly generated inn or tavern name, as well as an example of an actual, historical inn somewhere in the real world.

Show me some names!

Your inn might be called:
  • The Royal Anchor
  • The Gilt Beer
  • The Gilt Moon
  • The Pirate and Tankard
  • The Stag and Baron

Real life trumps imagination. How about ...
  • the Dog and Bear, named for bear-baiting.
  • the Bishop's Finger, named for a type of signpost on the Pilgrim's Way in Kent, UK.
  • the Silent Woman, Quiet Lady, and Headless Woman, pub names with uncertain origins, typically from a story about a landlady whose tongue was cut out by smugglers so she couldn't talk to authorities, or a saint beheaded for her Christianity.
To generate another set of names, simply refresh the page.

Does your local inn, pub or tavern have a curious or funny name? Drop a note in the comments for inclusion!

Sources

Wikipedia

Dark themes? The WWII adventure that didn’t happen

Recently I watched a couple of folks debate to what extent darker themes should be explored in roleplaying games. The example in question was rape and pedophilia, and the argument was that life is miserable enough as is, the point of roleplaying games is to get away from all that crap. A view which, I should add, I fully understand and support. Escape is the very point of escapist literature and games.

It got me thinking, though. I touch on dark themes as a game master, typically through non-player characters. These are typically the guys the players are going to end up fighting, investigating, or for that matter, out-right clubbing to death in a dark alley. They’re the bad guys. But sometimes, maybe it’s better to just not.

Allright, pull up some chairs and let me tell you a story. A long, long time ago—talking mid-90s here—I was writing a scenario for a roleplaying convention (I wrote a fair number of those). I had just spent a considerable amount of time researching the German occupation of France during World War II, and it seemed obvious to use the setting and time period that was already in my head.  With a twist, of course. There should always be a twist.

I wrote six player characters who were all members of the German forces, the Wehrmacht. I was planning for them to have received the classical ‘fight to the last man standing, save the last bullet for yourself’ kind of orders. But why? What could be so important in some small, French townlet that every minute it could be defended really made a difference? Whatever the Macguffin was, why did the German forces leave it, and the characters, behind? Would the characters decide to fight as ordered, or bail and try to find out what was going on?

Aha, I thought. I better play it safe and make sure that each of the six all had their doubts about the Third Reich. None of them were genuine Nazis. They were pretty much just drafted guys following orders and, as the American liberation forces approached, getting really cold feet about the whole thing.

I ended up tossing it. All of it. Why? Well, there was this sci-fi scenario…

Wut?

Story time, again. At my second roleplaying convention ever I got to play in a group where the characters supposedly knew each other in advance. They were all crew on the same starship. According to our character sheets, we knew each other quite well, trusted one another, and worked well together.

Yeah, about that.

Not a word against young roleplayers. We’ve all been there. Two of the players turned out to be thirteen-year-old boys. And, well. The very first line spoken in game was from the ship’s female captain (as played by 13-year-old), directed at 20-year-old me, playing the ship’s male pilot. It went: “I pull out a giant pink dildo and ask the pilot if he’s up for a little fun in the cockpit.”

Well, that was the end of that scenario. The poor GM tried desperately to get us on track but those two kids ruined everything. In the end, we walked away, GM included.

So, what’s that got to do with the Wehrmacht? Well, picture this. You start telling the story, only to discover that one player is having a party playing the master race. He wants to kill, murder, maim, and rape until everything is blood and gore. Or even worse—he turns out to be an actual ultra-rightwing socalled history nerd who goes ‘well, actually’ trying to defend white supremacy all night, and then intends to debate you for eight hours on the subject of Jochen Peiper’s guilt or lack of it in the Malmedy war crimes trial.

The argument I was watching was about rape. Should rape exist in a game world? I say yes, but not as something I want to see played out. It’s a crime, one that invites characters to chase down the criminal and dispense justice. It’s not a game. It’s particularly not a game if someone in the room has, at some point in his or her life, been sexually assaulted.

Some ideas should just be killed right away. Or at least locked up in a safe place. If you’re writing for public consumption, don’t go there. Keep it PG-13. If you’re writing for a group of people you know well, make it your duty to know what they’re comfortable with. Escapism and roleplaying games are about escaping and having fun. Real life is depressing enough at times that it’s perfectly legit to not want these things in your game.

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